McMaster University

Peter Boris Centre
for Addictions Research

Scope of Search

Active Projects

Behavioural Economic Trajectories of Alcohol misuse in
Hamilton (BETA-H) Study

Is a longitudinal study utilizing behavioural economic (BE) measures to predict changes in alcohol misuse from age 20 to 25 years old and to understand the other contributing risk factors and their relationship to the measures used.

[More details about the BETA-H project]


Population Assessment for Tomorrow's Health (PATH) Registry

This project is to understand the risk factors for addictive disorders. We are inviting individuals who are healthy and, individuals who have history of substance use, gambling and eating concerns, age 18 to 65 years old and residing within the greater Hamilton area. Contact us now to find out if you are eligible to participate!

[More details about the PATH project]


Genetic Basis of Impulsive Behavior in Humans

This project is to examine candidate gene, candidate system, and genome-wide correlates of distinct aspects of impulsivity. The study is in collaboration with investigators at the University of Chicago and is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.


Perceived Alcohol Reward Value and Risk: Neural Correlates and Treatment Effects

This project is investigating how a brief intervention for alcohol abuse affects the value and salience of alcohol in the brain. The study is in collaboration with investigators at the University of California, Los Angeles and is funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.


Vulnerability to Drug Use & HIV: Advancing Prevention for Rural African Americans

This is a multi-institution project to improve the understanding of drug abuse risk within a high-risk group, rural African Americans. The key institutions involved in this study are the University of Georgia, Emory University, Northwestern University, the University of Houston, and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton/McMaster University. The study is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.


Neuroimaging Approaches to Improve Prediction of Relapse during Smoking Cessation

This project is to use neuroimaging paradigms in the areas of craving, impulsivity, and distress tolerance to predict treatment outcomes among smokers attempting smoking cessation. The study is in collaboration with investigators at the University of Georgia and is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.


Enhancing Dissemination and Career Development via the APA Annual Convention

This knowledge translation/education grant is to encourage the dissemination of high-quality alcohol research and increase the pipeline of alcohol researchers joining the field. It includes travel awards and a trainee-dedicated poster session at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association. The project is in collaboration with an investigator at Rutgers (State University of New Jersey) and is funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Five trainees affiliated with the Peter Boris Centre presented their research at the 2015 early career poster session.


Stress and Drug Use Vulnerability in the African American Community

This project is to examine the longitudinal mechanisms of drug abuse risk among African Americans, focusing on stress biomarkers, impulsivity, and drug reinforcing value. The study is in collaboration with investigators at the University of Houston and University of Georgia; it is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.


Arrive and Thrive: A Campus-Community Partnership Project to Address Addictive Behaviours and Support Success in Incoming McMaster Students

This project is to implement and evaluate a program to improve screening and intervention for alcohol and other substance misuse at McMaster University, particularly for students in the transition to University. This study is funded by the Province of Ontario's Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities.


Genetics of Opioid Addiction

This project is investigating genetic variation as a predictor of success and failure in methadone maintenance treatment. The study was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.