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McMaster Faculty of Health Sciences Newsmagazine — Volume 6, Issue 1, Spring 2012

Minister of State for Science and Technology Gary Goodyear (second right) and Judah Denburg, scientific director and CEO of AllerGen NCE Inc., study a cord blood sample held by research technician Delia Heroux as students Sina Rusta Sallehy and Claudia Hui look on. Judah Denburg, scientific director and chief executive officer (CEO) of AllerGen Network of Centres of Excellence and professor in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, and Gary Goodyear, Minister of State for Science and Technology Gary Goodyear, Minister of State for Science and Technology, announcing $36.5 million in funding for the AllerGen Network of Centres of Excellence Judah Denburg, scientific director and chief executive officer (CEO) of AllerGen Network of Centres of Excellence and professor in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, speaking at the announcement Patrick Deane, McMaster's President and Vice-Chancellor, speaking at the AllerGen announcement

Minister injects more funding into the battle of allergies

Hay fever, eczema, asthma and other allergies are plaguing more and more Canadians.

But in March, the battle against these allergies and immune disease received a $36.5 million boost from the federal government.

Gary Goodyear, Minister of State for Science and Technology announced the renewed federal funding for the AllerGen Network of Centres of Excellence over the next seven years. The network, headquartered at McMaster University, includes almost 200 researchers from 23 universities and organizations.

"These diseases cause a lot of suffering and create an immense economic burden," Goodyear said. "AllerGen NCE has already had a very positive impact on Canada's ability to understand and prevent these illnesses and to improve care for patients."

The funding allows researchers to pin down underlying causes, develop new treatments and prevention methods for people living with allergies, asthma and anaphylaxis.

Judah Denburg, scientific director and chief executive officer of AllerGen and professor of medicine for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, said his team will work to decrease the burden of allergic and immune disease on Canadian's productivity and economic growth and lead major Canadian innovation and commercialization.

"We will be recognized globally," he said.

AllerGen was initially funded through the federal Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) program in 2004.