McMaster University

McMaster University

Faculty of
Health Sciences

Regional mood disorders program wins international award

Published: October 5, 1998

This weekend in Los Angeles, the McMaster Regional Mood Disorders Program was awarded the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Psychiatric Services Achievement Gold Award for 1998.

This regional program is a joint initiative with the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University and Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital, where it is located. It provides comprehensive and individualized assessment, treatment and rehabilitation for patients with mood disorders throughout Central West Ontario.

Dr. Trevor Young is program director, Ron Dolson is program manager, and Dr. Russell Joffe, who is also dean and vice-president of the Faculty of Health Sciences, is the program founder and senior consultant. The team was nominated by Dr. Richard Swinson, psychiatrist-in-chief of Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital and chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences within the Faculty.

The core services component of the Mood Disorders Program is built on a strong academic foundation including research ranging from basic sciences to novel treatment and service delivery models, and an education component consisting of the Depression Information Resource Education Centre (Toll-Free), also known as DIRECT. DIRECT announced today that it would move from being a provincial to a national line.

"This program is a highly successful example of melding academic enterprise with the service sector, public and private domains, and institutional and community service providers for the common goal of enhanced quality of care," says Swinson.

The American Psychiatric Association is a medical specialty society recognized world-wide. Its 40,500 U.S. and international physicians specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of mental and emotional illnesses and substance use disorders.

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