McMaster University

McMaster University

Faculty of
Health Sciences

New study looks at gap in care between hospital and home

Published: March 1, 2016
Carrie McAiney and Maureen Markle-Reid
From left: Carrie McAiney, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioural neurosciences with Maureen Markle-Reid, associate professor of nursing and co-lead of the study

It's almost a flip of a coin. At this time one in two seniors with multiple medical conditions will have depression when going home after hospital, but will receive limited follow-up care for this condition in the community.

This results in medication errors, readmission to hospital, reduced quality of life and higher costs to the health care system.

McMaster University researchers have received $1 million to look at what and how that transition could be better handled.

"We'll work with patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals to identify how to make transitions home from hospital both effective and efficient," said Maureen Markle-Reid, associate professor of nursing and co-lead of the study along with Carrie McAiney, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioural neurosciences.

The team will look at home visits, telephone follow-up and nurse-led co-ordination of care, and track follow-up hospital and doctor visits, as well as costs of the transitional care. The 30-month study will involve more than 200 older adults in Northern Ontario and South Central Ontario from Mississauga to Brant.

The funding for the researchers of McMaster's Aging, Community and Health Research Unit is an IMPACT award from the Ontario SPOR SUPPORT Unit, a collaborative network of Ontario health research centres funded by the Ontario government and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

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