McMaster University

McMaster University

Faculty of
Health Sciences

Student-centred learning focus of session

Published: October 25, 2011
Howard S. Barrows
Howard S. Barrows, a McMaster professor of medicine from 1970 to 1981 and one of the architects of McMaster’s problem-based learning
[View larger photo]

The concept of student-centred learning has spread internationally from health sciences and mathematical science to computing, applied sciences and engineering. Traditionally focused in small group, problem-based learning, questions are now directed at the challenges of implementing student-centred learning in the large class setting.

Various perspectives on this issue will be discussed by an expert panel on Friday, Oct. 28 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. in Room 3020 of the Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning and Discovery. All members of the McMaster community are invited to attend.

Panelists from different McMaster faculties include: Virginia Aksan, professor of history; Hannah Holmes, assistant professor of economics; Joseph Kim, assistant professor of psychology, neuroscience and behavior; David Lozinski, assistant professor, mathematics and statistics; Michelle MacDonald, assistant professor, biochemistry and biomedical sciences; Bridget O’Shaughnessy, assistant professor of economics. The panel will be chaired by Susan Vajoczki, director, Centre for Leadership in Learning. The session is sponsored by the Centre for Leadership in Learning and the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) Program (B.H.Sc.).

The panel discussion is part of a tribute to the late Howard S. Barrows, a McMaster professor of medicine from 1970 to 1981, who died earlier this year. He was one of the architects of McMaster’s problem-based learning who pioneered the concept of using simulated patients to train medical students.

The afternoon session starts with a reflection on Barrows’ major career achievements and speakers include H. B. White, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry of the University of Delaware; Cindy Hmelo-Silver, coordinator of learning sciences of Rutgers University; Vic Neufeld, professor emeritus of McMaster’s Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Karen McCaughan, curriculum development director for McMaster’s Program of Faculty Development and Physician Assistant Education Program. This session will be chaired by Susan Denburg, associate vice-president academic for the Faculty of Health Sciences.

P. K. (Chari) Rangachari, professor emeritus of medicine, is author of an article about the contributions of Barrows, Howard S. Barrows: An Appreciation, published online this month in Teaching and Learning in Medicine.

"He was the master facilitator, quiet, effective, sharp and critical," Rangachari said, citing Barrow’s many accomplishments including over 400 journal articles and 19 books.

The afternoon session is sponsored by the Centre for Leadership in Learning and the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) Program (B.H.Sc.).

Besides the panel discussions, the recipient of the 2011 Howard Barrows Teacher of the Year award will give a talk on Thursday, Oct. 27. Harold B. White, professor, department of chemistry and biochemistry, and director, Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Undergraduate Science Education Program, University of Delaware, will speak on strategies to promote active learning in biochemistry. His talk, named Why Does My Cruorine Change Colour?, will be held in the Health Sciences Centre, Room 4E20, from 11 a.m. to 12 noon. The seminar is sponsored by the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) Program (B.H.Sc.) and the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences.

Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Level Double-A conformance, W3C WAI Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0