McMaster University

McMaster University

Faculty of
Health Sciences

Two McMaster papers shortlisted for The Lancet’s best of year

Published: February 8, 2010
Sam Schulman
Sam Schulman, a professor of medicine of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine
Stuart Connolly
Stuart Connolly, a professor of medicine in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine

Two research papers published by McMaster University professors about the same drug have reached the short list of eight for the top paper of 2009 in a competition by the medical journal, The Lancet.

The journal is now hosting an online vote for which one of eight papers is most likely to change medical thinking, health research or clinical practice. The voting at www.thelancet.com closes Feb. 11 and the winner will be announced in The Lancet later this month.

One paper, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in September, was the result of an international study led by Stuart Connolly, a professor of medicine in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine and a member of the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University, and the RE-LY study group.

The study found that in patients with atrial fibrillation, dabigatran is superior to warfarin in the reduction of stroke and bleeding complications, especially bleeding into the brain.

The other nominated McMaster paper was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in December.

The study by Sam Schulman, a professor of medicine of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, and the RE-COVER study group found the oral drug dabigatran as safe and effective as warfarin for combating venous thromboembolism (VTE). The study of more than 2,500 patients found the drug did not require the routine monitoring or dose adjustments required by the conventional drug.

The candidate papers for The Lancet’s competition cover a broad range of science from genomics to surgery to public health, and will inform research, clinical practice, and health policy. They address common questions, such as predicting cardiac mortality; and common problems, such as the burdens of alcohol and obesity on mortality.

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