McMaster University

McMaster University

Faculty of
Health Sciences

Ontario funds emerging investigators, research infrastructure

Published: August 20, 2010
Katholiki Georgiades
Katholiki Georgiades, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences

Three emerging researchers in the Faculty of Health Sciences are among 10 investigators from McMaster University to be awarded Early Researcher Awards (ERA) by the Ontario Government. The awards – totaling $1.4 million – are given to recently appointed researchers to help them build their research teams of graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and research associates.

The announcement was made at McMaster University by Ted McMeekin, MPP for Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale, Patrick Deane, president of McMaster, and Mo Elbestawi, the university’s vice-president, research and international affairs.

ERA investigators receive $140,000 in provincial funding, and each award is matched with $50,000 from the university.

Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) recipients of ERA awards include: Katholiki Georgiades, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences; Peter Kavsak, an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine; and Shirya Rashid, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine.

In addition to the ERA awards, the province also announced its Ontario Research Fund – Research Infrastructure (ORF-RI) awards. The $18-million investment will support 104 projects and more than 1,300 researchers at 14 institutions across the province. McMaster University received $2.3 million in ORF-RI funding for 11 projects.

FHS recipients of ORF-RI awards include: Dawn Bowdish, an assistant professor of pathology and molecular medicine; Thomas Hawke, an associate professor of pathology and molecular medicine; Christoph Fusch, a professor in the Department of Pediatrics; Nathan Magarvey, an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences; and Jeffrey Weitz, a professor in Department of Medicine.

"Today's announcement represents an investment in researchers and projects that will be attracting the talents of more than 100 additional undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral students to 21 research teams," said Deane.

"The infrastructure funding also provides for the high performance equipment, specialized instruments and materials for lab renovations needed to advance the discoveries that will impact the health and well-being of millions of Canadians and advance technologies that will benefit the economy."


Links


2010 Early Researcher Award projects in the Faculty of Health Sciences

Helping immigrant youth stay mentally healthy and academically successful

Katholiki Georgiades, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, is conducting a study of 165 immigrant and non-immigrant Hamilton youth in Grade 4 to Grade 8. She will compare the mental health and academic achievement of the two groups, and identify both the risk and protective factors. These findings will inform the development of policies and programs for immigrant youth. 


Reducing the time to diagnose a heart attack

It can take a health care team up to nine hours and sometimes longer to identify a heart attack. Peter Kavsak, an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, is investigating how to diagnose it within the first 90 minutes, giving heart attack victims the care they need faster.


Reducing "bad cholesterol" levels in obese people to prevent cardiovascular disease

Shirya Rashid, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, is investigating whether altered levels of two proteins – resistin and adiponectin – secreted by the fat tissue of obese people increase their livers’ production of very-low-density lipoprotein or "bad cholesterol". If these proteins have such an effect, new drugs can be developed to reduce levels in obese people, potentially saving millions of lives. 

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